The world is hooked on Australian coffee culture. This is coffee articles australia how it got so good
The world is hooked on Australian coffee culture. This is coffee articles australia how it got so good
ABC News Homepage Search Log In Log In More from ABC More from ABC Close menu ABC iview Listen ABC Home News Radio iview Everyday More Editorial Policies Read our editorial guiding principles Accessibility Contact Us Terms of Use © 2021 ABC Just In Watch Live Coronavirus Politics World Business Analysis Sport Science Health Arts Fact Check Other News Home News Ticker COVID blog By the 2000s coffee shops, mostly independently owned, had become a very competitive scene. 1 / of 2 Get breaking news alerts directly to your phone with our app The world is hooked on Australian coffee culture. This is how it got so good / By Joey Watson There's a good chance that, alongside old tropes like Crocodile Dundee and AC/DC, the answer will be coffee. "It's safe to say Australian coffee is among the best in the world," says food critic Pat Nourse, who chairs the Oceania voting panel for the World's 50 Best Restaurants awards. "There has been, especially in the past five years, a much greater appreciation for quality espresso coffee. US correspondent Zoe Daniel meets the expats bringing Australian coffee culture to New York. "I think it has been for some time — we've just been a bit slow to wake up to it at home." "But Australia was slow to let its hair down," Professor May says. Print content Print with images and other media Print text only Print Cancel /news/best-australian-coffee-big-overseas/11747342 Copy link Share Article share options Share this on Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Send this by Email Messenger Copy link WhatsApp Stop an American on the streets of Manhattan and ask them what the best thing to come out of Australia is. Urban sociologist Emma Felton says Australia was "a culture in the process of defining itself, as distinct from its colonial origins". "The wider world is also waking up to the fact that we eat and drink really well in this country, despite the fact that our restaurant and cafe scenes are relatively young," he says. "This place uses only single-origin beans, that mob has cups made by a local ceramicist, the place over the road has its own cow — you know the drill." From a coffee crop on the First Fleet, to the Victorian goldfields and thirsty American soldiers stationed in Australia during World War II, the brew has long had a presence in Australia. Dr May says the gentrification of inner-city suburbs over time helped fuel coffee culture. "It's not just the chin-stroking inner-urban Instagrammer enclaves," Mr Nourse says. "There are lots of Australian-owned cafes in many major cities — New York, Paris, London, Berlin, San Francisco to name a few," Dr Felton says. Getty: Eric Lafforgue/Art in All of Us/Corbis "There is certainly a clear nexus between rising café culture and the discovery and commodification of the Australian inner city by middle-class migrants from the suburbs," Dr May says. "The introduction of espresso coffee … is nostalgically remembered by many as a key watershed between a drab past and a cosmopolitan present," historian Andrew May says. "Coffee was also still pretty expensive in the wake of World War Two. In 1951 10 times more expensive than tea." "France has done many great things for the food and drink of the world — coffee is not one of them." It was first brought to Australia in the late 1940s. And the trend stretched beyond the hip streets of inner-city neighbourhoods. "The sensationally innovative espresso machine a much more controllable process resulting in a less bitter brew with a creamy top that was a taste sensation," Professor May says. "The entire island of Manhattan has fewer really good places to get a coffee than Canberra." In recent years, the aroma of Australian coffee has drifted overseas, filling the streets of major towns and cities. "Generally, the roasts used by Australian venues are much smoother, lighter and more caramel compared to a lot of US coffee which is a much darker roast and more bitter. And Mr Nourse, who's seen "flat whites on menus everywhere from Xi'an to Valparaiso, coffee articles australia " says other local culinary cultures might join in. With their new decorative styles, they attracted an aspiring social set of Australian bohemians, who were joined by teenagers, bored of the old-style milk bars and steak pubs. 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"Everyone's pushing for a better cup," he explains. Ruby's, which in 2001 became one the first Australian cafes in New York, is now a hospitality group with 10 locations across the US. AEST = Australian Eastern Standard Time which is 10 hours ahead of GMT "Our baristas are sought after and it's not unusual to see the Aussie flat white on menus in cafes overseas." The world is hooked on Australian coffee culture. This is coffee articles australia how it got so good
The world is hooked on Australian coffee culture. This is coffee articles australia how it got so good
Get more stories that go beyond the news cycle with our weekly newsletter. But, like many of Australia's culinary successes, the triumph of Australian coffee is inseparable from immigration. By the 1960s a small mix of bohemians, teenagers, and migrants were gathering around coffee spots. "It provided freedom for experimentation and adaption, unleashed from the constraints of traditional European, say Parisian coffee culture," she says. That set Australia apart from other Western nations, whose culinary traditions were rooted in France. "It was a slow burn really, and the next wave of inner-city rejuvenation and gentrification from the early 1980s, and a new wave of Bohemian cafes, gave coffee another significant boost." "Australia stole a march on the other anglophone nations because the basis of our coffee culture was Italian, and southern Italian at that, rather than French," Mr Nourse says. Australian coffee culture, perfected and refined in recent decades, is taking hold in the US, with scores of "Australian-style" cafes springing up. That, Mr Nourse says, kept the quality high.
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